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Gluten Free Sourdough Recipes
A Quick Overview:

This section is dedicated to solely gluten free sourdough recipes.
Although most of you will already know, there are a few grains which contain gluten:

Gluten-containing grains:
• Barley
• Rye
• Wheat
• Triticale
Oats are generally regarded as gluten-free (but can be cross contaminated in processing facilities with wheat products).

Be aware of the source of gluten-free flour or grain you're buying from. Find out whether it's processed in the same facility as wheat.
Gluten Free:
• Oats (certified gluten-free: plant dedicated to oats only)
• Buckwheat (related to rhubarb, not wheat)
• Amaranth
• Arrowroot
• Brown rice
• Chickpea
• Corn flour
• Millet
• Potato
• Quinoa
• Teff
• Coconut
• Soya
• Tapioca
• Almond
Gluten Free Baking Tips:
• Baking with rice flour isn't always as simple as replacing the wheat flour with rice flour in the recipe, because rice contains no gluten.
• The xanthan gum in most gf-recipes helps bind everything (like gluten would). BUT unless you use a mix that is high in bean or tapioca flours, there is not enough protein in the flour for this to work.
• You can add protein by using egg whites or gelatin, depending on the pH of your water. This applies to all bread-making, but especially to gluten free breads: The water you use should have a pH between 5.5 and 6.5.
• Remember you can always use failed breads in the food processor and use the crumbs in other recipes, coating fried chicken, making bread pudding, etc! Freeze crumbs to have on hand whenever!
• Sweet rice flour is very starchy and moist and is best only as a boost to your baking. Too much creates a gummy mess. It also doubles as a gravy thickener. Start w/ 2 tablespoons.
• Coconut flour adds a luxurious taste and texture but soaks up a lot of your recipe's liquid water. Start with just 1/2 cup in a gluten free flour blend.
• Denser flours such as almond, buckwheat, coconut or quinoa will result in a heavier, denser product. Start with a third of a cup or 1/2 cup at most.
• Quinoa flour has a very distinct and strong flavor, so use sparingly - also adds a very crumbly texture.
• When using egg whites for structure, be careful not to over-whip, they will deflate as the cake cools.
• Gluten-free baked goods taste best the same day they are made. They also freeze well.
• Gluten-free flours may require more leavening to compensate for their lack of elasticity. If you convert a recipe, you may need to add about 25% more baking soda/baking powder than what is in the original wheat version.
• Yeast amounts in a yeast bread recipe usually don't need to be adjusted.
• Avoid clumping in gluten-free flours by first whisk dry ingredients in a separate bowl.
• Be careful not to over mix. Over mixing will toughen the dough.
• Gluten-free baked items can stick more to bakeware. Use non-stick pans, line your pans with parchment paper or coat lightly with shortening and then dust with a sprinkle of rice flour.
• Too much baking soda/baking powder will give a nice rise in the oven, but may cause your baked goods to fall as they cool.
Gluten Free Book Recommendations (check out your library first!:))
The Gluten-Free Gourmet Bakes Bread: More Than 200 Wheat-Free Recipes (highly recommended amongst gf bakers)
Gluten-Free Baking Classics
Gluten-Free Baking Classics for the Bread Machine
Easy Gluten-Free Baking
Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day: 100 New Recipes Featuring Whole Grains, Fruits, Vegetables, and Gluten-Free Ingredients
One last tip to leave you with: almost any recipe can be converted to sourdough. You don't have to find gluten free books catering towards sourdough, any old baking book can do. AND almost any recipe with flour can be given a more tangy flavor (and more digestibility) by substituting sourdough starter (which is just flour and water with cultures afterall) in recipes like cookies, cake, etc. Just be sure to cut down on the liquid the recipe calls for! Check out our baking conversion page for how to convert standard recipes to sourdough!
Gluten Free Sourdough RECIPES
Simple Sourdough Recipe

This is our basic gluten free go-to recipe, that is great for starting out. It also includes a delicious
waffle recipe! We have formatted it to print as a recipe card, making it perfect to stick in your favorite
recipe box or album!

View and Print this recipe

Gluten-free Sourdough Bread

Although it won't look or taste exactly like your standard bread, when you need to be gluten-free this is as good as it gets! You will first need to purchase a gluten-free bread flour or make your own.

There are many wonderful gluten-free bread mixes to purchase in your local specialty store or on Amazon, which can be used for this recipe, including:

Pamela's Wheat-Free Amazing Bread Mix
The Gluten-Free Pantry Favorite Sandwich Bread Mix
Bob's Red Mill Gluten-Free Homemade Wonderful Bread Mix
Kinnikinnick Foods Gluten-Free Bread & Bun Mix

Or to make your own flour, simply combine these ingredients:

Flour recipe:

3 cups garbanzo/fava bean flour (see notes)
2 cups potato starch or 2 cups cornstarch
1 cup tapioca flour
1 cup sorghum flour

OR you may try this combination (it is supposed to be slightly tastier, but more complicated):

2 cups fava/garbanzo bean flour
1 cup sorghum flour
2 ¼ cups tapioca flour
2 ¼ cups arrowroot flour (starch)
1 cup rice flour
1 tablespoon potato starch
2 tablespoons potato flour
2 tablespoons xanthan gum
2 packages gelatin (unflavored)
¼ cup sugar
1 ½ teaspoon salt

Bread recipe:

This recipe has been converted from grams. As with most bread recipes, the amounts are approximate, go ahead and adjust your dough if its too wet or too dry! This recipe was formed using gluten-free flour from a UK company, 'Doves Farm'.

300g prepared starter (about 1 1/4 cups)
500g gluten free bread flour (about 4 cups) (from any of the above store or home-made versions)
300ml warm water (about 1 1/4 cups)

Mix until you have a workable dough - not too wet or sticky - add flour or water a tiny bit at a time to get the right consistency if necessary. Knead for about 10-15 minutes. Then cover with plastic wrap or heavy cloth and leave for until doubled (usually around 4 hours, you may retard the dough by letting it rise in your fridge for 12-24 hours for a more sour flavor and slower rise. The original recipe for this calls for a 12 hour room temp rise, which you can experiment with too (but it may produce an over-fermented bread with poor oven spring and a pale crust).

Pre-heat oven to 200°C/400°F. Punch down down and knead briefly, then shape it into a torpedo- shape log. Place on a greased or parchment paper lined baking sheet. Cover again to let rest and rise another half hour. Bake for 30-35 minutes until golden and produces a hollow sound when tapping the bottom. Spray first 5 minutes for a crisper crust.

Let cool on a wire rack, and store in a sealed bag for a softer bread or a paper bag for a crunchier one! Wrapping in towels is the best of both worlds, keeping the crust mostly dry and the inner bread from drying out as quickly as a paper bag.

Sourdough 'Rye' Bread (based off a red star recipe)

No actual rye is used in this delicious adaptation for a rye-mimic gluten free bread.

Wet:
1 cup water
3 eggs
3/4 cup ricotta cheese (any % is fine)
1/4 cup molasses
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1 tsp apple cider vinegar
3/4 cup sourdough starter

Dry:
2 cups white rice flour
2/3 cups potato starch
1/3 tapioca flour
1/2 dry milk powder
3 1/2 tsp xanthan gum
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 tbs caraway seeds
2 tsp instant coffee

Mix all of wet section until well combined. Mix all of dry section until well combined. Then very gradually add dry to wet and mix together with a mixer on low speed for 10 minutes. At this point you can pour it into a 9x5 greased, lined or nonstick loaf pan and let rise for 2-3 hours. Bake at 375 F/190°C for 30-60 min until a toothpick comes out clean (much like a muffin recipe). Let cool in pan 10 minutes before removing it to a wire rack to cool. Cool completely before slicing.

White Sourdough Bread (based off a red star recipe)

Wet:
1 cup water
3 eggs
3/4 cup ricotta cheese (any % is fine)
1/4 cup honey
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1 tsp apple cider vinegar
3/4 cup sourdough starter

Dry:
2 cups white rice flour
2/3 cups potato starch
1/3 tapioca flour
1/2 dry milk powder
3 1/2 tsp xanthan gum
1 1/2 tsp salt

Similar to the 'rye' bread recipe above, but omits the molasses, caraway and coffee - leaving you a nice light white bread with a touch of honey. Mix all of wet section until well combined. Mix all of dry section until well combined. Then very gradually add dry to wet and mix together with a mixer on low speed for 10 minutes. At this point you can pour it into a 9x5 greased, lined or nonstick loaf pan and let rise for 2-3 hours. Bake at 375°F/190°C for 30-60 min until a toothpick comes out clean (much like a muffin recipe). Let cool in pan 10 minutes before removing it to a wire rack to cool. Cool completely before slicing.

Authentic Sourdough Waffles (based off the recipes in Alaska Sourdough )

This recipe also works equally well for pancakes (we like to make double the amount and use half as waffles, half as pancakes, freezing the extras to stick in the toaster another morning!)

Heat the the butter in a pan until its melted and then add the cold milk to cool.
1/2 cup (4 oz or 115 g) butter
1 cup (8 oz or 225 g) milk
Add the milk-butter mixture to:
1 cup (9 oz or 255g) starter (brown rice fed starter)
1 tsp salt
1 Tbsp (packed) brown sugar
1 1/2 cups (6 oz or 170 g) gluten-free mix or gluten free flour of your choice (oat, buckwheat, amaranth, arrowroot, brown rice, chickpea, corn flour, millet, potato, quinoa, teff, coconut, soya, tapioca, almond, etc). A nice mix that we like is oat flour along with rice flour and a touch of buckwheat for a heartier flavor.

Mix these together to form a thick batter, cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap and let stand at
room temperature for 8-14 hours. If you do this before going to bed, you’ll have the batter ready for
breakfast the next day.

Preheat your waffle iron for 10-15 minutes.
Uncover the batter and whisk in 2 large eggs and 1/4 tsp baking soda. Pour 1/2 to 3/4 cups of batter on the hot waffle iron and close the lid. Let cook for 3-5 minutes until golden brown and crisp

Traditional Sourdough Pancakes (based off the recipes in Alaska Sourdough )

3 large eggs
1 cup milk
2 cups Sourdough Starter (brown rice fed starter)
1 3/4 cups gluten-free mix or gluten free flour of your choice (oat, buckwheat, amaranth, arrowroot, brown rice, chickpea, corn flour, millet, potato, quinoa, teff, coconut, soya, tapioca, almond, etc). A nice mix that we like is oat flour along with rice flour and a touch of buckwheat for a heartier flavor.
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup butter melted

Beat eggs in a medium bowl. Add milk and sourdough starter. Sift together flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and sugar; add to the egg mixture, mixing well. Stir in melted butter. Lightly grease a hot griddle. Drop the batter by 1/4 cup onto the griddle and cook until light brown, turning once. Serve hot and drizzle with some pure maple syrup and butter!

Adapted Sourdough Pancakes (or waffles, based off the recipe from the Yukon River
Lodge)

Mix together dry ingredients:

1 cup tapioca flour (not tapioca starch)
1/3 cup dry milk or soy powder (you may also use a dry milk substitute, liquid milk or soy.
Decrease water in recipe if so, and add this in the wet ingredients mix, not the dry).

1/3 cup brown sugar, packed
1 teaspoon zanthum gum (found on many online sites now and most grocery stores)
1/3 cup corn starch or potato starch
1/3 cup dry whole eggs (can use 2 fresh eggs or egg beaters, but add them with the wet ingredients mix.

Mix liquid ingredients together and then add to dry ingredients, mixing with a whisk until well blended and smooth.
1 Tablespoon olive oil
1 teaspoon vanilla extract (check that it is gluten free, pure vanilla extract)
3 tablespoons honey
1 cup rice sourdough starter
Add a little warm water at a time while mixing until the mixture is the just a little thicker than a standard pancake batter. You will be adding more water later.

Let batter sit for about 15 minutes in a warm place (near stove if pre-heating cast iron skillet works well, or inside oven with oven light on)

Then mix 1 teaspoon of baking soda with 1/4 cup warm water. Fold this gently into the batter (don't over mix). Now your batter is ready.

6. Scoop out about 1/4 cup batter per pancake onto your hot pan (pre-oil/grease if necessary) and cook, flipping after you see edges dry a bit and bubbles form in center.

7. Avoid stacking or you'll end up with soggy pancakes. Use a trivet or eat immediately. :)

You can also use these to make cheese toast to serve with soup- fry with butter, flipping to coat each side with parmesan cheese, until cheese is melded and cooked to bread. Season with paprika. OR make batter thinner for crepes,

You can also let them dry out for a day to make gluten free bread crumbs, bread pudding, or crouton substitutes.

Adapted Sourdough Oat Waffles (from Gluten A Go Go)

Equipment Needed: Plastic or Wooden Spoon; Plastic, Glass or Wooden Bowl

1 cup Sourdough Starter
1 cup lite coconut milk
1/2 cup oat flour**
1/2 cup sweet rice flour
1/4 cup arrowroot starch
1/4 cup rolled oats**
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
3 Tb agave syrup

1. In a medium sized bowl, dump in the sourdough starter, coconut milk and 1/2 cup oat flour. Stir together and then cover.

2. Put in a warm place to ferment for 8 to 24 hours. The longer this batter has a chance to sit the stronger the sourdough flavor will become.

3. When you are ready to cook the waffles, add the next seven ingredients. Stir to combine and then allow it to sit for a few minutes.

4. Preheat the waffle iron, when it is ready pour in the recommended amount of waffle batter for your type of waffle iron. Spread the batter to the edges and cook until a golden brown color.

5. Remove the waffle from the iron. Serve with your choice toppings. Makes 4 Belgian waffles.

What did my family think of the sourdough waffles? Everyone thought they were great, especially when served with warm maple syrup.

Notes:
*You can use other gluten free flours to make your starter and other flours to feed it. If you are allergic to rice or you do not have permission to eat oats, feel free to substitute another gluten freeflour.

** If you have your doctor's okay to consume oats, you can find certified gluten free oats at: Bob's Red Mill, Cream Hill Estates, Gifts of Nature, Glutenfree.com, Glutenfreemall.com, and Glutenfreeoats.com.

Sourdough Pizza (from Gluten A Go GO)

1 1/2 cup Sourdough Starter
1/2 cup Brown Rice Flour
1/2 cup Corn Flour
1/2 cup Arrowroot Starch
1 tsp Sea Salt
1 Tb Olive Oil
1 Tb Agave Syrup
1/2 cup Water (dough may need 1 or 2 Tb more)
1 1/2 tsp Kudzu Powder, dissolved in the Water

Pizza Toppings

Pizza Sauce
Fresh Basil
Mozzarella Cheese
Sage Sausage
Any Topping You Like

Equipment Needed: A plastic or wooden spoon, a large glass, plastic or wooden bowl, pizza pan or pizza stone.

1. If you have a sourdough starter already, bring it out and let it come to room temperature. If you don't have a sourdough starter, then follow the directions on making a sourdough starter which is on my post for Sourdough Waffles.

2. In a large glass mixing bowl, dump in the first six ingredients and stir together.

3. Pour in the agave syrup and slowly start adding the water until the dough forms a moist soft ball. Depending on your baking conditions, you may need to add one or two tablespoons of water more to the dough.

4. Cover and place in a warm location for 1 hour to rise.

5. Cover a pizza pan with parchment paper. Pour out the pizza dough into the center of the pizza pan. The dough will be very soft and bubbly. Sprinkle corn flour over the top of the dough and dip your fingers into the flour to keep them from sticking. Pat out the dough into a circle using the corn flour as needed.

6. While the dough rests, preheat your oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit and gather your pizza toppings.

7. Spread the pizza sauce over the top of the dough then sprinkle with fresh basil sliced into fine strips. Then place the mozzarella cheese around the top and sprinkle with sage sausage.

8. Bake for 15 minutes or until the top is slightly brown and the cheese is bubbly. Allow to cool and then slice.

What did my family think about this pizza? They all thought that this was the best gluten free pizza I had ever made. I agreed, the crust was light and soft and the bottom crisp. The slices held together beautifully while you held them to eat. This is a keeper.Sprouted Grain Doughnuts with Coconut Vanilla Glaze

Sprouted Grain Doughnuts with Coconut Vanilla Glaze

Adapted to sourdough from Nourished Kitchens, which adapted theirs from the Ladies’ Home Journal Cookbook, published in 1960.

Not specifically a gluten-free recipe, but worth a mention for those who can tolerate sprouted grain! :)

Makes approximately 12 – 18 doughnuts.

Sprouted Grain Doughnuts: Ingredients
3/4 Cups Milk
2 Tablespoons Honey
1 Teaspoon Unrefined Sea Salt
½ Cup Butter
1 Egg, Beaten
2 cups sourdough starter
2 1/2 Cups Sprouted Flour
Coconut Oil or Pastured Lard for Frying

Melt butter, then mix in honey, salt and milk. Making sure it's just warm (hot will kill the starter), add the starter and then mix in the beaten egg.

Add sprouted flour and knead thoroughly. If it is too sticky add tiny bits of flour at a time while kneading until its soft, smooth and pliable without sticking too much (a little tackiness is fine). If it's dry, spritz hands with water and knead until it's moist enough.

Form into a ball and allow to rise until double in bulk (2-4 hours).

Once the dough is doubled in bulk, roll it out with a rolling pin until ½-inch thick. Cut with a doughnut cutter or other tool. You can easily use an inverted mason jar or lid for the doughnut and an apple corer (or smaller bottle lid) for the center.

Heat a ½-inch to ¾-inch deep worth of coconut oil or pastured lard in a deep cast iron skillet over a medium-high flame.

Fry doughnuts 3 – 4 at a time in the oil. They’ll puff up nearly immediately.

Turn when golden brown after a few seconds and fry the other side.

Remove doughnuts, cool and drain.

Top with coconut vanilla glaze:

1 Cup Coconut Oil, melted
3 Tablespoons Honey
1 Teaspoon Vanilla (pure, gluten-free extract)

Whip melted coconut oil, honey and vanilla together. Keep warm and viscous, but not hot. Pour over doughnuts as desired. Should thicken as it cools (if you can resist eating them right away that is!)
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